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Table 1 Baseline demographics (N = 185)

From: Can we predict which patients with plantar heel pain are more likely to benefit from insoles? A secondary exploratory analysis of a randomized controlled trial

  Total population
N = 139
mean (SD) unless otherwise indicated
Sham insole group
N = 69
mean (SD) unless otherwise indicated
Custom made insole group
N = 70
mean (SD) unless otherwise indicated
Age, y 48.1 (10.4) 48.2 (9.4) 48.0 (11.3)
Sex, female, N (%) 96 (69.1) 48 (69.6) 48 (68.6)
BMI, kg/m2 29.3 (5.3) 29.5 (4.8) 29.2 (5.8)
Pain history
 FFI total score (0–100) 48.2 (18.1) 46.1 (17.2) 50.2 (18.8)
 FFI pain score (0–100) 57.8 (17.0) 55.6 (17.2) 60.0 (16.7)
 FFI disability score (0–100) 39.5 (21.5) 37.3 (19.7) 41.6 (23.1)
 First step pain score (0–10) 7.2 (2.2) 7.3 (2.1) 7.2 (2.4)
 Pain at other sites than the affected foot, N (%) 61 (43.9) 32.0 (46.4) 29.0 (41.4)
 DN4 score (0–10) 3.8 (2.0) 3.6 (1.8) 3.9 (2.1)
 Localization of complaints, bilateral, N (%) 32 (23.0) 16 (23.2) 16 (22.9)
 Duration of symptoms, months 6.4 (11.6) 5.1 (5.2) 7.7 (15.5)
Activity
 Squash questionnaire 0 – ∞ 7751,1 (5246.0) 8755.3 (5747.8) 6761.3 (4525.5)
Podiatrist measurements
 Upper ankle dorsal flexion range of motion (degrees) 16.42 (1.43) 15.52 (2.24) 17.34 (1.77)
 MTP1 dorsal flexion range of motion (degrees) 61.38 (2.09) 61.11 (3.10) 61.65 (2.83)
 Pronated foot posture in the affected foot according to the foot posture index, N (%) 39 (28.1) 26 (37.7) 13 (18.6)
 Supinated foot posture in the affected foot according to the foot posture index, N (%) 14 (10.1) 7 (10.1) 7 (10.0)