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Table 4 Assessment and management of diabetic foot ulceration

From: How do Australian podiatrists manage patients with diabetes? The Australian diabetic foot management survey

  Total Public Private pValue
M (IQR) M (IQR) M (IQR)
Believe foot ulcers to be serious requiring immediate management? 6 (5 – 7) 7 (6 – 7) 6.5 (5 – 7) <0.001
Grade foot ulcer severity based on depth, infection status and peripheral arterial disease status? 6 (4 – 7) 7 (6 – 7) 6 (4 – 7) <0.001
Grade foot ulcer severity according to the University of Texas Wound Classification System? 4 (1 – 6) 6 (4 – 7) 2 (1 – 4) <0.001
Perform sharp debridement of non-ischaemic ulcers? 7 (6 – 7) 7 (6 – 7) 6 (5.5 – 7) 0.022
Use topical hydrogel dressings for autolytic debridement of non-ischaemic ulcers? 4 (2 – 5) 4 (3 – 5) 4 (2 – 5) 0.395
Use wound dressings that create a moist wound environment for non-ischaemic ulcers? 6 (5 – 7) 6 (6 – 7) 6 (4 – 7) < 0.001
Use wound dressings that maintain a dry wound environment for ischaemic ulcers? 5 (3 – 6) 6 (5 – 7) 5 (3 – 6) < 0.001
Believe that offloading in order to reduce pressure at the ulcer site is necessary to aid healing? 7 (6.5 – 7) 7 (7 – 7) 7 (6 – 7) 0.177
Use total contact casting? 1 (1 – 3) 3 (1 – 4) 1 (1 – 2.5) < 0.001
Use a removable cast walker rendered irremovable or instant total contact cast? 2 (1 – 4) 4 (2 – 5) 2 (1 – 4) < 0.001
Use a removable offloading device (for example orthoses, felt, shoe modifications)? 6 (5 – 7) 6 (5 – 6) 6 (5 – 6) 0.781
  1. M, median; IQR, interquartile range.
  2. 1 = never (0%), 2 = very rarely (1 – 20%), 3 = rarely (21 – 40%), 4 = sometimes (41 – 60%), 5 = often (61 – 80%), 6 = very often (81 – 99%), and, 7 = always (100%).