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Table 3 Assessment and prevention of diabetic foot complications (Pre-diabetic foot ulceration)

From: How do Australian podiatrists manage patients with diabetes? The Australian diabetic foot management survey

  Total Public Private pValue
M (IQR) M (IQR) M (IQR)
Assess for risk of developing foot complications? 7 (6 – 7) 7 (6 – 7) 7 (6 – 7) 0.111
Inquire about previous foot ulcers and amputations? 7 (6 – 7) 7 (6 – 7) 7 (5 – 7) 0.001
Visually inspect feet for structural abnormalities? 7 (7 – 7) 7 (7 – 7) 7 (6 – 7) 0.253
Visually inspect feet for wounds? 7 (7 – 7) 7 (7 – 7) 7 (7 – 7) 0.165
Assess for neuropathy? 7 (6 – 7) 7 (6 – 7) 7 (6 – 7) 0.414
Assess for neuropathy using a 10 g monofilament? 7 (6 – 7) 7 (6 – 7) 7 (6 – 7) 0.122
Palpate their foot pulses? 7 (6 – 7) 7 (6 – 7) 7 (6 – 7) 0.214
Perform an Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) or Toe Pressure assessment? 4 (2 – 5) 4 (3 – 6) 3 (1 – 4) <0.001
Classify their risk of developing foot complications? 7 (6 – 7) 7 (6 – 7) 7 (5 – 7) 0.149
Provide foot care education to prevent foot complications? 7 (6 – 7) 7 (6 – 7) 7 (6 – 7) 0.709
Provide or recommend footwear to prevent foot complications? 6 (6–7) 6 (6 – 7) 6 (6 – 7) 0.927
Recommend a review assessment annually for low risk patients? 7 (6 – 7) 7 (6 – 7) 7 (6 – 7) 0.721
Recommend a review examination within 6 months for patients with foot risk factors? 7 (6 – 7) 7 (6 – 7) 7 (6 – 7) 0.991
  1. M, median; IQR, interquartile range.
  2. 1 = never (0%), 2 = very rarely (1 – 20%), 3 = rarely (21 – 40%), 4 = sometimes (41 – 60%), 5 = often (61 – 80%), 6 = very often (81 – 99%), and, 7 = always (100%).