Skip to main content

Advertisement

Table 3 Reported interventions and perceived effectiveness

From: Unknotting night-time muscle cramp: a survey of patient experience, help-seeking behaviour and perceived treatment effectiveness

Intervention Number of users Perceived effectiveness
   Useless A little help Quite helpful Very helpful 100% effective Unrated
During cramp to reduce pain
Getting out of bed to stand or walk* 77 4 21 19 27 5 1
Stretching calf* 75 20 22 20 12 1  
Massage* 69 6 42 13 7   1
Heat application 4    3 1   
Running on the spot 1   1     
To prevent cramp
Magnesium 46 12 16 11 5   2
Water, drinking more* 36 11 19 5    1
Stretching calf during day or before bed* 24 7 11 2 1   3
Massage during day* 21 5 11 5    
Quinine 18 1 1 7 7 2  
Crampeze tablet/capsule 13 5 6 2    
Tonic water 5 1 2 2    
Gatorade/poweraid 4 1   3    
Salt 3   1   2   
Crampeze cream 2   1 1    
Vitamin B 2   1 1    
Akineton (biperiden) 2 1 1     
Hamstring stretching 2 1 1     
Lyrica (pregabalin) 1     1   
Schuessler tissue salts (homeopathic preparation) 1     1   
Camphor in bed 1    1    
Cramp away (homeopathic preparation) 1    1    
Exercise and stretching with personal trainer 1    1    
Filtered water 1    1    
Homeopathic drops containing ginkgo 1    1    
Iron tablets 1    1    
Japanese green tea 1    1    
Acupuncture 1   1     
Calcium 1   1     
Epsom salt bath 1   1     
Glucosamine 1   1     
Minerals 1   1     
Panadol osteo 1   1     
Tegretol (carbamazepine) 1   1     
Shaking of legs during shower 1   1     
Aspirin 1 1      
Fish oil 1 1      
Mandopar (levodopa and benserazide)) 1 1      
Multi vitamins 1 1      
Potassium 1 1      
Vitamin E 1 1      
Vitamins 1 1      
Zinc 1 1      
Bananas 1       1
Oranges 1       1
  1. *Participants were asked whether they had tried interventions identified with an asterisk. Non-asterisked interventions were identified by participants when asked whether they had tried any other interventions
  2. Interventions are ordered from most to least commonly reported. Where a particular treatment is reported as commonly as another, interventions are ordered from perceived most to least effective, then in alphabetical order.